Fall 2019

FYS 100RRR – Philosophy of War

M & W – 5:00-6:15 – Tribble Hall A307

Clark Thompson

This course studies the implications of moral theory for the determination of when war is morally permissible and of how war is to be conducted if it is to be waged in a morally acceptable way.  Our questions include the following: To what extent is military action justified when used to address humanitarian crises, to promote liberal or democratic values, or to combat oppression by foreign countries of their own citizens? Can a meaningful distinction be drawn between combatants and noncombatants? Should a defense of superior orders shield military subordinates from accountability for illegal acts they commit in war? To what extent are citizens in a democracy responsible for their state’s decision to go to war?

PHI 111A (95749) – Basic Problems of Philosophy (Freshman Only)

T & TR – 9:30-10:45 – Tribble Hall A306

Christian Miller

This course will be concerned with some of the most challenging and interesting questions in all of human experience. For example, we will consider some of the arguments for the existence of God, whether God would allow evil to exist, whether faith is compatible with reason, whether there is an objective morality, whether we should be moral at the expense of self-interest, whether the death penalty is morally permissible, and what we should do about famine. In each case, we will examine particular questions not only with an aim at arriving at the truth, but also with an aim at determining what relevance these questions have to our ordinary lives.  The text will be Joel Feinberg and Russ Shafer-Landau, Reason and Responsibility (Wadsworth Press, most recent edition) and our readings will be drawn from both classic and contemporary sources.

PHI 111D (95753) – Basic Problems of Philosophy

T & TR – 11:00-12:15 – Tribble Hall A306

Francisco Gallegos

This course aims to introduce students to the discipline of philosophy. Philosophy is the activity of wrestling with life’s Big Questions, such as questions about the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, morality, and meaning. Students will grapple with these questions as they relate to a wide variety of topics—including death, God, power, privilege, oppression, race, gender, education, happiness, and love—and become acquainted with the work of fascinating historical and contemporary philosophers. Throughout the semester, students will have an opportunity to discover, refine, and articulate their own core philosophical views and practice engaging constructively with the philosophical views of others.  

PHI 111B (95751) – Basic Problems of Philosophy

M, W, & F – 10:00-10:50 – Tribble Hall DeTamble (A110)

Staff

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111C (95752) – Basic Problems of Philosophy

M, W, & F – 11:00-11:50 – Tribble Hall A304

Staff

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111E (95759) – Basic Problems of Philosophy

M, W, & F – 2:00-2:50 – Tribble Hall A306

Staff

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111F (97393) – Basic Problems of Philosophy

M, W, & F – 11-11:50 – Tribble DeTamble Auditorium

Staff

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111G (97394) – Basic Problems of Philosophy

M, W, & F – 1:00-1:50 – Greene 311

Staff

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111H (97395) – Basic Problems of Philosophy

M, W, & F – 3:00-3:50 – Tribble A102

Staff