Fall 2021

FYS 100 – Sports and Society – Adam Kadlac
Section ??? (???????) M & W – 9:30-10:45 a.m.– Classroom TBA
Section ??? (???????) M, W, & F – 12:00-1:00 p.m. – Classroom TBA

In this course, we will examine a number of ethical questions that arise in the world of sports, ranging from the use of performance enhancing drugs to whether college athletes should be paid.  Along the way, we will think about the role that sports play in shaping our broader cultural norms as well as the ways that our broader cultural norms are reflected in the world of sports.  Assignments will include regular short essays and oral presentations.

PHI 111A (99179) – Problems of Philosophy – Francisco Gallegos
W & F – 9:30-10:45 a.m. – Classroom TBA

This course will introduce you to philosophy, the discipline that grapples with some of life’s biggest questions—such as: How can I know what’s really going on? What does it mean to be happy? To be a good person? To be free? How can I be true to myself despite all of the pressure others put on me? What is the meaning of life? How did I get this body, and what can I do with it? Is it time for the revolution? Which one? In this course, you will explore how philosophical questions like these relate to pressing issues in your own life and in your community, while becoming acquainted with a diverse array of historical and contemporary philosophers.

PHI 111 – Problems of Philosophy – Jonathan Barker
Section B (99183)– M & W – 11:00-12:15 – Classroom TBA
Section C (99191) – M & W – 12:30-1:45 p.m. Classroom TBA

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts o the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111D (95749)– Problems of Philosophy – Christian Miller
(Freshman Only)
M, W, & F – 2:00-2:50 p.m. – Classroom TBA

This course will be concerned with some of the most challenging and interesting questions in all of human experience. For example, we will consider some of the arguments for the existence of God, whether God would allow evil to exist, whether faith is compatible with reason, whether there is an objective morality, whether we should be moral at the expense of self-interest, whether the death penalty is morally permissible, and what we should do about famine. In each case, we will examine particular questions not only with an aim at arriving at the truth, but also with an aim at determining what relevance these questions have to our ordinary lives.  The text will be Joel Feinberg and Russ Shafer-Landau, Reason and Responsibility (Wadsworth Press, most recent edition) and our readings will be drawn from both classic and contemporary sources.

PHI 111 –Problems of Philosophy – Justin Jennings
Section E (99195) – T & TR – 2:00-3:15 p.m. Classroom TBA
Section F (99199) – T & TR – 3:30-4:45 p.m. Classroom TBA

How should we live? Who has authority? What is good? What is just? What is real? Who are we? How can we know? In this course, we address these questions by reading the principal works of the historically most significant thinkers of Western philosophy.

PHI 111G (99202) – Problems of Philosophy – Win-chiat Lee
M & W – 5:00-6:15 p.m. – Classroom TBA

Inquiry into the nature of law and its relation to morality. Classroom discussions of readings from the works of classical and modern authors focus on issues of contemporary concern involving questions of legal principle, personal liberty, human rights, responsibility, justice, and punishment.

PHI 111H (99203) – Problems of Philosophy – Stavroula Glezakos
T & TR – 5:00-6:15 p.m. – Classroom TBA

Thorough readings, other media, lectures, and class discussions, we will conduct a study of some central philosophical questions about knowledge, free will, morality, and religion.

Students who complete this class should be able to:

(1) understand and describe some major areas of philosophical inquiry
(2) identify specific philosophical issues and explain them using philosophical vocabulary
(3) identify, formulate, and evaluate philosophical arguments, and
(4) articulate and argue for their own philosophical views.

PHI 114A (99181)– Philosophy of Human Nature – Patrick Toner
W & F – 9:30-10:45 a.m. – Classroom TBA

Is there such a thing as human nature?  If so, what is it like?  In this class, we examine some of the many answers that have been given to those questions.  Those answers come from east and west, from the past and from the present, from religious figures and from scientists.  We’ll evaluate all of them as philosophers.  Our course texts will be Twelve Theories of Human Nature by Stevenson et al and The Abolition of Man by CS Lewis.

PHI 160A (99197) – Intro to Political Philosophy – Adrian Bardon
M, W, & F – 3:00-3:50 p.m. – Classroom TBA

This course concerns theories of justice. Is the proper purpose of organized society to protect individual rights or to promote the general welfare?  Is there a natural right to property? Is there a natural right to equal opportunity? And what would equal opportunity look like? This course examines the role of views about justice in determining attitudes about liberty, equality, and authority, and, in so doing, provides an overview of major issues in social and political thought. There will be a significant community engagement project as part of our study of justice.

PHI 161A (99201) – Introduction to Bioethics – Ana Iltis
T – 4:00-6:30 p.m. – Classroom TBA

A study of ethical issues that arise in health care and the life sciences. Topics to be explored include questions about death and organ donation, regenerative medicine, genetic testing and research, and the allocation of health care resources, among others.

PHI 164A (99194) – Contemporary Moral Problems – Emily Austin
M & W – 2:00-3:15 p.m. – Classroom TBA

Study of pressing ethical issues in contemporary life, such as abortion, euthanasia, healthcare, animal suffering, inequity, pornography, and criminal justice.

PHI 232A (99196) – Ancient Greek Philosophy – Emily Austin
T & TR – 2:00-3:15 p.m. – Classroom TBA

Study of the central figures in early Greek philosophy, beginning with the Presocratics, focusing primarily on Plato and Aristotle, and concluding with a brief survey of some Hellenistic philosophers.

PHI 241A (99184) Modern Philosophy – Justin Jennings
T & TR – 11:00-12:15 – Classroom TBA

Study of the works of influential 17th and 18th-century European philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant, with a concentration on theories of knowledge, metaphysics, science, and religion.

PHI 280A (99178) Topics in PHI: Environmental Ethics – Francisco Gallegos
T & TR – 9:30-10:45 – Classroom TBA

What moral obligations do we have to the environment, if any? Where do these obligations come from? What ethical ideals should guide us, personally and collectively, as we seek to address climate change, environmental justice, and other challenges related to human beings’ relationship with nature? In this course, you will examine how these questions have been addressed by a diverse array of historical and contemporary philosophers, while actively investigating their relevance to pressing issues in your own life and in your community.

PHI 360A (99188) and PHI 660AG (99190) – Ethics – Christian Miller
M &W – 12:30-1:45 p.m.- Classroom TBA

This course will be concerned with some of the most challenging and interesting questions in all of human experience. For example, we will consider some of the arguments for the existence of God, whether God would allow evil to exist, whether faith is compatible with reason, whether there is an objective morality, whether we should be moral at the expense of self-interest, whether the death penalty is morally permissible, and what we should do about famine. In each case, we will examine particular questions not only with an aim at arriving at the truth, but also with an aim at determining what relevance these questions have to our ordinary lives.  The text will be Joel Feinberg and Russ Shafer-Landau, Reason and Responsibility (Wadsworth Press, most recent edition) and our readings will be drawn from both classic and contemporary sources.

PHI 362A (99177) – Social and Political PHI – Adam Kadlac
M & W – 9:30-10:45 a.m. – Classroom TBA

Contemporary political discourse is filled with a cacophony of voices advocating alternative views concerning the role of government.  A host of difficult theoretical questions thus lie in the background of many disputes about public policy and whether our country is “headed in the right direction”: What, if anything, justifies the intrusion of the state into the private lives of individuals?  What responsibilities do we have to each other as members of the body politic?  And how should we make political decisions in the face of rampant disagreement about fundamental moral issues?  Though it may be a surprise to some, these questions are not new, and our aim in this class will be to examine some key texts in the history of political thought in an effort to better understand our current political climate.

PHI 363A (99200) – Philosophy of Law – Win-chiat LeeT &TR – 3:30-4:45 p.m. – Classroom TBA

Inquiry into the nature of law and its relation to morality. Classroom discussions of readings from the works of classical and modern authors focus on issues of contemporary concern involving questions of legal principle, personal liberty, human rights, responsibility, justice, and punishment.

PHI 369A (99193) Philosophy and Psychology – Adrian Bardon
M, W, & F – 2:00-2:50 – Classroom TBA

A broad examination of the philosophy and psychology of bias, motivated reasoning, self-deception, and denial. We will discuss the roles of ideology, personality, and identity in science denial, in political economy, in racism, and in religious belief.

PHI 374A (99185) and PHI 674AG (99186) – Philosophy of Mind – Patrick Toner
W & F – 11:00-12:15 – Classroom TBA

Selection from the following topics: the mind-body problem personal identity; the unity of consciousness; minds and machines; the nature of experience; action, intention, and the will.

PHI 377A (99198) Metaphysics – Jonathan Barker
M & W – 3:30-4:45 p.m. – Classroom TBA

A survey of such issues as the nature and existence of properties, possibility and necessity, time and persistence, causation, freedom and determinism, and dualism versus materialism about the human person.