Fall 2022

FYS 100 – The Idea of America
Section H (62123) – W & F – 9:30-10:45 a.m. – Location: TBA
Section HHH (62217) – W & F – 11:00-12:15 – Location: TBA
Adam Kadlac

This course will take a philosophical look at American history by examining four key periods: the war for independence, the drafting and ratification of the US Constitution, the Civil War, and the civil rights movement.  Our aim will be to reflect on the founding ideals of the United States and what such ideals might require of us as citizens.

PHI 111A (62726) – Problems of Philosophy
M, W, & F – 9:30-10:45 a.m. – Location: TBA
Francisco Gallegos

This course will introduce you to philosophy, the discipline that grapples with some of life’s biggest questions—such as: How can I know what’s really going on? What does it mean to be happy? To be a good person? To be free? How can I be true to myself despite all of the pressure others put on me? What is the meaning of life? How did I get this body, and what can I do with it? Is it time for the revolution? Which one? In this course, you will explore how philosophical questions like these relate to pressing issues in your own life and in your community, while becoming acquainted with a diverse array of historical and contemporary philosophers.

PHI 111D (62739) – Problems of Philosophy – (Freshman Only)
M, W, & F – 11:00-11:50 a.m. – Classroom: TBA
Christian Miller

This course will be concerned with some of the most challenging and interesting questions in all of human experience. For example, we will consider some of the arguments for the existence of God, whether God would allow evil to exist, whether faith is compatible with reason, whether there is an objective morality, whether we should be moral at the expense of self-interest, whether the death penalty is morally permissible, and what we should do about famine. In each case, we will examine particular questions not only with an aim at arriving at the truth, but also with an aim at determining what relevance these questions have to our ordinary lives.  The text will be Joel Feinberg and Russ Shafer-Landau, Reason and Responsibility (Wadsworth Press, most recent edition) and our readings will be drawn from both classic and contemporary sources.

PHI 111B (62730) – Problems of Philosophy
M & W – 11:00-12:15 – Location: TBA

Win-chiat Lee

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111 – Problems of Philosophy
Section F (63952) – M & W – 11:00-12:15 – Location: TBA

Section G (63953) – M & W – 12:30-1:45 – Location: TBA
Jonathan Barker

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111 – Problems of Philosophy
Section C (62738) – T & R – 11:00-12:15 – Location: TBA
Section E (62742) – T & R – 12:30-1:45 – Location: TBA
Justin Jennings

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111H (64301) – Problems of Philosophy
T & R – 3:30-4:45 –  Location: TBA
Alex Hortal

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111I (64314) – Problems of Philosophy
M & W – 2:00-3:15 – Location: TBA
Matt Shields

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 111J (64331) – Problems of Philosophy
M & W – 2:00-3:15 – Location: TBA
Jonathan Dixon

Examines the basic concepts of several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, and matter.

PHI 114A (62738) – Philosophy of Human Nature
W &F – 9:30-10:45 a.m. – Location: TBA
Patrick Toner

Is there such a thing as human nature?  If so, what is it like?  In this class, we examine some of the many answers that have been given to those questions.  Those answers come from east and west, from the past and from the present, from religious figures and from scientists.  We’ll evaluate all of them as philosophers.  Our course texts will be Twelve Theories of Human Nature by Stevenson et al and The Abolition of Man by CS Lewis.

PHI 114B (64317) – Philosophy of Human Nature
T & R – 2:00-3:15 – Location: TBA
Tobias Flattery

A study of selected topics bearing on human nature, such as free will and determinism, the relation of mind and body, personal identity and personhood, and immortality.

PHI 161A (62748) – Intro to Bioethics
T – 4:00-6:30 p.m. – Tribble Hall A304
Ana Iltis

 A study of ethical issues that arise in health care and the life sciences. Topics to be explored include questions about death and organ donation, regenerative medicine, genetic testing and research, and the allocation of health care resources, among others.

PHI 163A (64260) – Environmental Ethics
M & W – 2:00-3:15 p.m. – Location: TBA
Amanda Corris

An examination of ethical issues concerning the environment as they arise in individual lives and public policy.

PHI 232A (63956) – Ancient Greek
W & F – 11:00-12:15 – Location: TBA
Patrick Toner

A study of the central figures in early Greek philosophy, beginning with the Presocratics, focusing primarily on Plato and Aristotle.

PHI 280A (62725) – Topics: Philosophy of Emotions
T & R – 9:30-10:45 a.m. – Location: TBA

Francisco Gallegos

This course examines the nature of emotions and their relationship to meaning, knowledge, morality, and justice. Special focus will be given to the politics of emotions: How do emotions sustain or undermine political agency? And how do political forces influence and structure our emotions? Diverse philosophical perspectives on these topics will be considered. Assignments include writing regular reading reflections, holding weekly small group discussions, and crafting pieces of public philosophy that apply the course material to real-world issues of your choice.

PHI 343A (63906) – Topics: Kant – Practical Philosophy
T & R – 3:30-4:45 – Tribble A306
Justin Jennings

Study of Kant’s principal contributions to theory of action, theory of value, and moral and political philosophy. PHI 341 is not a prerequisite for this course.

PHI 360A (62735)/660AG (62737) – Ethics
M & W – 12:30-1:45 p.m. – Location: TBA

Christian Miller

This course will be concerned with some of the most challenging and interesting questions in all of human experience. For example, we will consider some of the arguments for the existence of God, whether God would allow evil to exist, whether faith is compatible with reason, whether there is an objective morality, whether we should be moral at the expense of self-interest, whether the death penalty is morally permissible, and what we should do about famine. In each case, we will examine particular questions not only with an aim at arriving at the truth, but also with an aim at determining what relevance these questions have to our ordinary lives.  The text will be Joel Feinberg and Russ Shafer-Landau, Reason and Responsibility (Wadsworth Press, most recent edition) and our readings will be drawn from both classic and contemporary sources.

PHI 362A(64025)/662AG (64026)  – Social and Political Philosophy
T & R – 11:00-12:15 – Location: TBA
Adam Kadlac

This course will examine the work of selected contemporary philosophers on topics such as the state, patriotism, justice, rights, freedom, and equality.

PHI 363A (62747) – Philosophy of Law
M & W – 2:00-3:15 – Location: TBA
Win-chiat Lee

What is law? Does law have to be just or reasonable in order to be binding? Can we interpret the law without making moral judgments? These are some of the more general questions regarding the nature of law and legal reasoning that will be discussed in the first part of the course. In the second part of the course, we will explore the moral limits of criminal law and discuss some of the philosophical issues regarding individual liberty and the aw–issues such as the legislation of morals, freedom of expression, and legal paternalism. In the third and final part of the course, we will deal with the extent of responsibility and liability in tort and criminal law. The overall topic is the relation of law to morality.

PHI 374A (64254) – Philosophy of Mind
T & R – 2:00-3:15 – Location: TBA
Amanda Corris

Selection from the following topics: the mind-body problem; personal identity; the unity of consciousness; minds and machines; the nature of experience; action, intention, and the will.

PHI 375A (63903)/675AG (63904) – Philosophy of Language
T & R – 12:30-1:45 – Location: TBA
Stavroula Glezakos

We use language to talk about the world, to express our thoughts, to communicate with others, and to achieve various other ends (some of which we may not realize or acknowledge). In this class, we will examine and discuss philosophical investigations into these phenomena.

The philosophical study of language is largely conceptual. Philosophers focus on concepts that are essential to our thinking about language – concepts like meaningreferencetruthcommunication – with the aim of analyzing and illuminating those concepts, making sure that they are internally coherent and that they figure into a consistent conceptual network. This project of analysis usually proceeds by the identification of various features of language and language use, and the giving of reasons and arguments and thought experiments to support explanations and theoretical accounts of those phenomena.

In this course, we will examine the work of some influential philosophers of language. We will then consider how that work might help us understand and address matters of social and political importance involving language and uses of language.

PHI 376A (64315) – Epistemology
M & W – 5:00-6:15 – Location: Tribble Hall A307
Matt Shields

The sources, scope and structure of human knowledge. Topics include: skepticism; perception, memory, and reason; the definition of knowledge; the nature of justification; theories of truth.

PHI 385A (63954)/685AG (63955) – Social Metaphysics
M & W – 3:30-4:45 – Location: Tribble A306
Jonathan Barker

We live in a social reality. We are patrons of social establishments like restaurants, stores, and universities. We are members of social groups like fraternities, sororities, and sports teams. We are governed by political bodies like the Congress and the Supreme Court. Indeed, aspects of our very selves are arguably constituted by social identities and social roles—we are teachers, students, roommates, children, parents, philosophy majors, and so on. But what are these social phenomena, most fundamentally? Are they real? Do they have causal powers? What is social construction? Are socially constructed entities a part of the material world? Are gender, race, and disability social constructions? This course is a survey of contemporary social metaphysics.